The meaning of having faith

Faith is the belief in something one cannot explicitly prove. It’s the belief in a higher power, the belief in an eternal, omniscient, and an omnipotent god. Having faith is having confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see. Faith is the result of believing in the Bible, in the Quran, and a Higher power. When we allow the reality of this Belief to affect every part of our lives, it changes the way we think which changes the way we behave. This is the meaning of having faith.

Faith and suffering
Image by Gert Altmann from Pixabay

Suffering

Every one of us sooner or later walks through hell. The hell of hurting someone or the hell of being hurt, the hell of cancer, the hell of divorce, the hell of a loved one in trouble, the hell of addiction, or the hell of grief. The point is to make your life worthy of your suffering. I believe there is profound power in the suffering we endure if we transform it into a more meaningful life. I am not glorifying or suggesting that the lessons we learn from pain are somehow worth the cost. But the truth is that most often for most people, real change is the result of real pain.

For me, my suffering is fibromyalgia, depression and as if these two weren’t enough to add pregnancy and hyperemesis brought me to my knees. You see, you can never understand the pain until you live through it yourself. With fibromyalgia and depression, I have good days and I have bad days, but I can manage and function to some extent. Now, my house is like a mini-clinic where nurses visit regularly. It’s a difficult time for my family, especially my kids. They miss their happy, active, funny, chief, and mother. My husband is my hero, I don’t know how he’s doing it all. Without my faith, I don’t know who I would be or what I would do.

Faith and suffering
Image by Anthony Tran from Pixabay

I have faith in God

I believe that there is one and only God, in angels, in predestination, in the judgment day, in the holy books, and the messengers of God. This has always been my faith. My faith is what is helping me manage and appreciate life even in sickness. Now let me tell you that it has not been easy for me, I was angry for a while. “why me”?, why is my God allowing this to happen?, these are the questions I often ask myself. I could stay angry at my creator and reject him or I could accept that this is a test of my faith. With the first option, it’s not like I am going to get the answer to my questions by staying angry. Moreover, it will create a list of complex questions that I will have no answer for. However, if I accept it, I not only find humidity in my suffering but I also find peace in getting closer to my creator.

Why is faith in God important?

My experience with pain helps me understand and appreciate life. Life owes us nothing and it’s with his grace that we can breathe and do anything. When in need, he sends people that would be of help your way, people you may know, and people you may not know. He has his way of doing things that just when you’re ready to give up, or when you think there is no way out, he shows you the way out or gives you hope. But you have to believe in him and trust that he knows what he’s doing. Gratitude is intertwined with faith. I am not saying that everything becomes easier because you have faith, or that because you have faith bad things will not happen to you, but he gives you the strength to survive every single one of your suffering. Think about it, how much pain and suffering can a human heart endure before it gives up? Not much.

Are there days I cry? Sure! Are there moments I wish everything was fine and I am not sick? Definitely! But I know just like everything in life, there is a start and an end, I believe in his plan for me even if I cannot foresee it.

To the one going through the hell of anything, know that you’re not forgotten, that your suffering has an ending. Take it one day at a time and practice gratitude every day, stay positive, and never lose hope.

Below is a list of the benefits of practicing gratitude and how to practice it.

 11  benefits of practicing gratitude?
  1. Reduces symptoms of depression
  2. Lowers blood pressure
  3. Increases long-term happiness
  4. Reduces instances of depression
  5. Increases life satisfaction
  6. Makes us more optimistic
  7. Makes us more resilience
  8. Boost self-esteem
  9. Increases selflessness
  10. Improves and strengthens relationships
  11. Increases social support
17 ways to practice gratitude
  1. Keep a gratitude journal, this is one of my favorites. It helps to focus on the goods things in my life rather than the negatives ones
  2. Take time to appreciate nature and enjoy its beauty, things we usually miss
  3. Think of a lesson you can learn from a stressful situation rather than the stress itself
  4. Think of something or someone you are grateful for right when you wake
  5. Reflect on the people or things you are thankful for
  6. Keep a single gratitude list and add to it every day
  7. Think of a positive thought whenever a negative one pops up in your head
  8. Write a thank-you note whenever possible
  9. Share what you are grateful for around the dinner table
  10. Do a random act of kindness
  11. Watch motivational videos
  12. Thank everyone that helps you
  13. Spend time with loved ones
  14. Volunteer with an organization that interests you
  15. Choose love always
  16. Set a time to reflect on how your day went
  17. Tell your loved ones how much you love and appreciate them

 

 

What do you believe in? How do you cope with pain and suffering? How does your belief shape your life?

 

 

 

Raina with a chronic illness is pleased to introduce her guest, Elizabeth Holly, from chronic wonderer. picture of Elizabeth HollyElizabeth Holly is a Women’s Fiction writer and blogger with a BA in English & Creative Writing. She writes about chronic and mental illness, self-care and loves talking about books. Check out her blog, A Chronic Wanderer where Elizabeth shares her journey as a writer living with chronic and mental illness and encourages others to create and thrive despite their illnesses. You can find her on her blog at www.elizabethholly.com, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Depression

Everyone gets sad, frustrated or struggles with sleep from time to time. That is a normal part of life. Depression, as in major depression or clinical depression, is a common but severe form of depression that lasts for longer than 2 weeks. It is a combination of symptoms, including irritability, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, …changes in appetite or sleep patterns, feelings of worthlessness or guilt or helplessness, a loss of enjoyment in your usual activities, and possibly suicidal thoughts. Depression affects the ability to feel, think, and handle daily activities. Yet, men and women display their symptoms differently making it difficult to diagnose men in a timely manner.

Mental illness

Mental illness is a general term used to describe a group of illnesses that may impact individual thoughts, perceptions, and behavior. It can affect a person’s professional and personal relationships.  Mental illness can be treated with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or medications, sometimes doctors use a combination of both. There are different types of mental health issues.

Types of mental health issues

Anxiety disorders

Anxiety disorder is a group of mental health disorders…

Mental illness

Mental health statistics estimated that one in five adults in the U.S. lives with mental illness. Mental illness is categorized into a broad category, ranging from mild to severe, any mental illness (AMI) and serious mental illness (SMI). AMI encompasses all recognized mental illnesses, SMI is a small yet severe subset of AMI.  According to the National Institute of Mental Health,  AMI and SMI are defined as follow:

Rainawithchronicillness is pleased to have a special guest blogger, Malinda, author, and creator of Mohr From Life–  Plugin Editora blog dedicated to mental health and self-improvement. She is going to take us on her personal journey of the aftermath of an anxiety attack. Imagine what her life is like living with anxiety and having to deal with the aftermath.

Anxiety episode

If you haven’t experienced an anxiety attack (also known as a panic attack), then you might not realize how it affects people. The aftermath of an anxiety attack can be deliberating. Let me share a personal story with you.

I woke up tremendously excited for the day ahead. In a few hours, my family and I would drive to the airport and fly to Queensland. Later that day I would see Taylor Swift perform at the Gabba. However, my excitement quickly turned to extreme dread and a panic attack.

My 16-year-old brother decided he wasn’t going to come on our holiday. He refused to get out of bed and get ready. Firstly, Dad and I both tried to change his mind; I begged and… pleaded with my little brother. As a result, I started to cry uncontrollably as my anxiety went through the roof.

Are you a people pleaser?

People-pleasers are often individuals with low self-esteem and self-worth issues. They feel responsible for how others feel, and they often apologize. While praise and kind words can make anyone feel good, people-pleasers depend on validation. Their self-worth depends on what others think of them. People- pleasers go to a great length to avoid conflict at all costs and feel uncomfortable when people are angry at them. They can’t say no…